Rock Products

AUG 2017

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68 • ROCK products • August 2017 www.rockproducts.com Aggregates Industry Almanac Economic Impact of the Industry The Quarry Golf Course (Giants Ridge Resort, Minn.) Sculpted out of a former sand quarry, the Quarry at Giants Ridge is an excellent example of a repurposed industrial site and it is a fitting tribute to northeastern Minnesota's rich mining history. Today, the Quarry is the number one public golf course in Minnesota, according to Golf Digest. Since its opening, it has also been ranked in the top 20 public courses in the United States every year it has been eligible. 39 Six Flags (San Antonio) This amusement park occupies ground that once provided material to build the surrounding community. The former limestone quarry first produced aggregates in 1934 in a much less developed location compared to the San Antonio of the 21st century. 40 According to Theme Park Review, Six Flags Fiesta Texas is the most picturesque park in the Six Flags chain because the former rock quarry "creates a back- drop for the park and allows for some unique interaction between rides." 41 Chambers Bay Golf Course (Puget Sound, Wash.) Chambers Bay is a public golf course in the northwest Unit- ed States, located in University Place, Wash., on Puget Sound southwest of Tacoma. 42 Formerly a sand and gravel quarry, within 10 years of starting reclamation the site went from an abandoned quarry to a world-class golf course which hosted 2015 U.S. Open Golf Championship in 2015. 43 Conclusion In this SCORECARD, we demonstrate that the aggregates industry – crushed stone, sand and gravel – is a significant contributor to the economic wellbeing of the United States. Not only does the aggregates industry generate $27 billion in annual sales and employ 100,000 workers at above-aver- age wages, but the economic activity in the sector has large effects on other industries. The industry supports $122 bil- lion in national sales, $32 billion in national earnings (i.e., wages), and between 364,000 and 600,000 jobs across a wide range of occupations and industries. Each job in the aggregates industry supports an additional 4.87 jobs throughout the economy; each dollar of earnings (i.e., wages) creates another $4.19 of earnings in other sec- tors; and each dollar of sales in the industry produces an- other $3.47 of sales in other industries. The effect of the aggregates industry is both large and di- verse. Proposals to expand infrastructure spending to repair and expand the nation's crumbling infrastructure portends a higher demand for the aggregates industry's outputs and, in turn, a positive and material impact on jobs, earnings and sales in many sectors of the nation's economy. George S. Ford, PhD., is chief economist and Lawrence J. Spi- wak, Esq., is president of the Phoenix Center for Advanced Legal and Economic Public Policy Issues. Reprinted with Per- mission. Citations 1 Failure To Act Closing The Infrastructure Investment Gap For America's Economic Future (UP- DATE), American Society of Civil Engineers (May 2016) (available at: http://www.infrastructure- reportcard.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/ASCE-Failure-to-Act-Reportfor-Web-5.23.16.pdf). 2 Id. at p. 13. 3 Id. 4 Id. at p. 14. See also B. Borzykowski, Cashing In on Trump's $1 Trillion "Rebuilding America" Plan, CNBC (January 12, 2017) ("Repairing roads also has an economic benefit beyond new construction jobs – a smoother ride gets people to work faster, said Dennis Mitchell, the Toron- to-based manager of Sprott Asset Management's Global Infrastructure Fund. "There's tangible benefit to spending money here," he said. "Improving roads to get people from A to B faster and

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