Rock Products

JAN 2013

Rock Products is the aggregates industry's leading source for market analysis and technology solutions, delivering critical content focusing on aggregates-processing equipment; operational efficiencies; management best practices; comprehensive market

Issue link: https://rock.epubxp.com/i/102692

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 18 of 67

pared with that sold or used in the third quarter of 2011. The largest decreases in percentages were recorded in the East South Central (19 percent), the Middle Atlantic (18 per‐ cent), and the East North Central (10 percent) divisions. Pro‐ duction‐for‐consumption of aggregates decreased in 31 of the 45 states that were estimated. The five leading states, in descending order of production‐ for‐consumption, were Texas, California, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Illinois. Their combined total production‐for‐consump‐ tion was 169 Mt and represented 29 percent of the U.S. total. The estimated production‐for‐consumption of crushed stone in the third quarter of 2012 decreased in all but one of the geographic divisions compared with that sold or used in the third quarter of 2011. The largest decreases were recorded in the East South Central (17 percent), the Mountain (14 percent), and the Middle Atlantic (14 percent) divisions. Pro‐ duction‐for‐consumption of crushed stone decreased in 34 of the 46 states that were estimated. The five leading states, in descending order of production‐ for‐consumption, were Texas, Pennsylvania, Missouri, Ohio, and Illinois. Their combined total production‐for‐consump‐ tion was 114 Mt and represented 34 percent of the U.S. total. The estimated production‐for‐consumption of construction sand and gravel in the third quarter of 2012 decreased from the third quarter 2011 levels in seven of the nine geographic divisions. The largest decreases in percentages were recorded in the Middle Atlantic (30 percent), the East South Central (27 percent), and the Pacific (10 percent) divisions. Production‐for‐consumption of construction sand and gravel decreased in 31 of the 47 states that were estimated. The five leading states, in descending order of production‐ for‐consumption, were California, Texas, Minnesota, Michi‐ gan, and Ohio. Their combined total production‐for‐consumption was 83 Mt and represented 34 percent of the U.S. total. Spending on private construction was at a seasonally ad‐ justed annual rate of $592.1 billion, 1.6 percent (±1.5 per‐ cent) above the revised September estimate of $582.7 billion. Residential construction was at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of $294.2 billion in October, 3.0 percent (±1.3 percent) above the revised September estimate of $285.7 billion. Nonresidential construction was at a seasonally ad‐ justed annual rate of $297.9 billion in October, 0.3 percent (±1.5 percent) above the revised September estimate of $297.0 billion. In October, the estimated seasonally adjusted annual rate of public construction spending was $280.1 billion, 0.8 percent (±3.1 percent) above the revised September estimate of $277.7 billion. Educational construction was at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of $69.3 billion, 0.9 percent (±5.6 per‐ cent) above the revised September estimate of $68.6 billion. Highway construction was at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of $76.7 billion, 2.4 percent (±7.2 percent) below the re‐ vised September estimate of $78.6 billion. New Construction Starts New construction starts during the first 11 months of 2012 on an unadjusted basis were reported at $424.4 billion, up 3 percent compared to the same period a year ago, according to McGraw‐Hill Construction, a division of The McGraw‐Hill Companies. Again, one of the down areas was in the highway construction sector, which was down 9 percent. Over the first 11 months of 2012, the Dodge Index averaged 97. "The current year has seen an up‐and‐down pattern for construction starts, and November qualifies as one of this year's weaker months," stated Robert A. Murray, vice presi‐ dent of economic affairs for McGraw‐Hill Construction. "Much of the recent variation has been related to unusually large projects in a given month, and the absence of such projects in November for public works and electric utilities contributed to the slowdown for overall construction. At the Construction Spending The U.S. Census Bureau of the Department of Commerce an‐ nounced that construction spending for the latest month and year‐to‐date were up. The one big down spot was highways, which year‐over‐year, were down. During October 2012, construction spending was estimated at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of $872.1 billion, 1.4 percent (±2.0 percent) above the revised September esti‐ mate of $860.4 billion. The October figure is 9.6 percent (±2.3 percent) above the October 2011 estimate of $795.7 billion. During the first 10 months of this year, construction spend‐ ing amounted to $707.4 billion, 9.3 percent (±1.3 percent) above the $646.9 billion for the same period in 2011. www.rockproducts.com ROCKproducts • JANUARY 2013 17

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

Archives of this issue

view archives of Rock Products - JAN 2013