Rock Products

NOV 2014

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ROCK products • NOVEMBER 2014 19 www.rockproducts.com deposit is north of Fort McMurray. Athabasca Minerals has a prospective frac sandstone deposit in this area with an es‐ timated capacity of 1,000,000 tpy (Claim Post Resources Inc., 2013). Preliminary testing indicates that the Firebag sand meets or exceeds API/ISO specs for frac sand. A loca‐ tion that is 1,200 mi (about 2,000 km) closer to key Cana‐ dian markets makes this project advantageous. British Columbia The Rocky Mountain foothills between Mackenzie and Fort St. John: The Middle to Upper Triassic Liard Formation, the Upper Triassic Charlie Lake Formation; and the Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous Monteith Formation and Lower Cretaceous Monach Formation of the Minnes Group are the most prospective bedrock units assessed for poten‐ tial frac sands in the province (Hickin and others, 2010). The Liard Formation is mainly a calcite‐cemented, fine‐ to medium‐grained, well‐ to sub‐rounded to sub‐angular, 90 percent quartz arenite of marine shoreface origin (Hickin and others, 2010). The Charlie Lake Formation is a calcite‐ cemented, fine‐ to medium‐grained, well‐ to sub‐rounded, feldspathic arenite of marine intertidal origin (Hickin and others, 2010). The Monteith Formation is a silica‐cemented, fine‐ to medium‐ to coarse‐grained, sub‐angular to sub‐ rounded, 95 percent quartz arenite of deltaic origin (Hickin and others, 2010). The Monach Formation is a medium‐ to coarse‐grained sand and coarse to granule conglomerate, rounded to sub‐rounded, 95 percent quartz arenite of deltaic origin (Hickin and others, 2010). Horn River Basin: unconsolidated deposits with good po‐ tential as frac sands include the Komie glaciofluvial delta deposits on the western edge of the Horn River Basin (Hickin and others, 2010). Dawson Creek: unconsolidated deposits with good poten‐ tial as frac sands include the Redwillow glaciofluvial delta south of Dawson Creek (Hickin and others, 2010). Fort Nelson: unconsolidated deposits with good potential as frac sands include the aeolian deposits of the Fontas Dune Field southeast of Fort Nelson (Hickin and others, 2010). Golden: The Moberly frac sand project is due to expand its glass sand mine for potential frac sand with an estimated capacity of 300,000 tpy (Claim Post Resources Inc., 2013). Prince George, Nelson: Stikine Energy Corp. has two active frac sand exploration projects, the Nonda and Angus projects, each having an estimated capacity of 1,000,000 tpy (Claim Post Re‐ sources Inc., 2013). These are north of Prince George near the Yukon border (Levson and others, 2012). The projects will re‐

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